The Art of Escaping in Jiu-Jitsu: Techniques to Get Out of Bad Positions

The Art of Escaping in Jiu-Jitsu: Techniques to Get Out of Bad Positions

Are you tired of feeling trapped and helpless on the jiu-jitsu mat? It’s time to master the art of escaping and regain control of your fights! In this article, we will explore effective techniques that will help you get out of bad positions and turn the tables on your opponents. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced practitioner, these proven strategies will give you the confidence to escape even the toughest situations. Don’t let your opponents dictate the outcome of your jiu-jitsu matches – learn the art of escaping today!

Escaping from Mount Position

Bridge and Roll Escape

The bridge and roll escape is one of the fundamental techniques in Jiu-Jitsu for escaping from the mount position. This technique is highly effective in situations where your opponent has mounted you and is applying heavy pressure.

To execute the bridge and roll escape, start by bridging your hips off the ground with force while simultaneously turning onto your side. This will create an angle and disrupt your opponent’s balance, making it easier for you to escape. As you bridge, use your free arm to control your opponent’s arm on the same side, preventing them from posting and maintaining their balance.

Once you have successfully bridged and turned onto your side, continue the motion by rolling over your shoulder towards your opponent. As you roll, use your legs to trap your opponent’s leg on the side you rolled towards. This will prevent them from easily re-establishing the mount position.

Shrimp Escape

The shrimp escape is another effective technique for escaping from the mount position in Jiu-Jitsu. This technique focuses on creating space and using hip movement to escape the mount.

To perform the shrimp escape, start by bringing your elbows close to your body and placing your hands on your opponent’s hips. This will help you establish a solid base and prevent your opponent from easily transitioning to a higher mount position.

Next, shift your hips to the side opposite of your opponent’s mount. This movement is similar to the motion of a shrimp, hence the name of the technique. As you shrimp, use your legs and hips to push against your opponent, creating distance and making it harder for them to maintain control.

Continue shrimping until you have created enough space to bring your knee up and place it between you and your opponent. This will allow you to establish a half-guard position or even work towards regaining full guard.

Knee-to-Elbow Escape

The knee-to-elbow escape is a versatile technique that can be used to escape from the mount position in Jiu-Jitsu. This escape focuses on using your arms and legs to create leverage and regain control.

To execute the knee-to-elbow escape, start by bringing one knee up towards your elbow on the same side. This will create a barrier between your opponent and your upper body, making it harder for them to maintain control.

Simultaneously, use your other arm to frame against your opponent’s chest or neck, creating space and preventing them from applying excessive pressure. This will also help you maintain balance during the escape.

Once you have established the knee-to-elbow barrier and framed against your opponent, begin to bridge and turn onto your side. This motion will disrupt your opponent’s balance and create an opportunity for you to escape.

As you bridge and turn, continue to use your arms and legs to create leverage and regain control. You can use your free leg to push against your opponent’s leg or hip, making it harder for them to maintain the mount position.

By combining proper technique and timing, the knee-to-elbow escape can be a highly effective method for escaping from the mount position in Jiu-Jitsu. Practice and repetition are key to mastering this technique and increasing your chances of successfully escaping bad positions.

Escaping from Back Control

Defending the Rear Naked Choke

When you find yourself in the back control position in Jiu-Jitsu, one of the most dangerous submissions to watch out for is the Rear Naked Choke. This submission can quickly end a match if not properly defended. Here are some techniques to help you defend against the Rear Naked Choke:

  1. Hand Fighting: The first line of defense is to prevent your opponent from securing a clean grip around your neck. Use your hands to fight for hand control, trying to break their grip or create obstacles for them to secure the choke.

  2. Protecting the Neck: If your opponent manages to secure a grip around your neck, it’s crucial to protect your carotid arteries. Tuck your chin down towards your chest, creating a barrier that makes it harder for your opponent to apply pressure and cut off the blood circulation.

  3. Hand Placement: Position your hands between your neck and your opponent’s arms, creating a barrier that prevents them from fully locking in the choke. By keeping your hands in the right positions, you can buy yourself some time to escape or counter their attack.

Escaping the Seat Belt Grip

Another common scenario when escaping from back control is dealing with the seat belt grip. This is when your opponent wraps their arms around your chest, with one arm over your shoulder and the other arm under your armpit. Here’s how to escape the seat belt grip:

  1. Create Space: The first step is to create space between you and your opponent. Use your hands and elbows to push against their arms and hips, creating enough room to start working your escape.

  2. Shrimp and Roll: Once you’ve created enough space, shrimp your hips towards the side where your opponent’s arm is over your shoulder. Simultaneously, hook your leg on that same side and roll towards your back. This movement will help you break their grip and put you in a more advantageous position.

  3. Counterattack: As you roll and escape the seat belt grip, be prepared to counterattack. Look for opportunities to secure a dominant position, such as taking your opponent’s back or transitioning into a guard position, where you can launch your own offensive attacks.

Using the Turtle Position

The turtle position can be a valuable tool when escaping from back control in Jiu-Jitsu. By assuming the turtle position, you make it harder for your opponent to secure submissions or control your movements. Here’s how to effectively use the turtle position:

  1. Protect Your Neck: In the turtle position, keep your chin tucked down towards your chest to protect your neck from chokes. This will make it more challenging for your opponent to apply a successful submission.

  2. Hand and Leg Placement: Position your hands and arms in a way that allows you to defend against attacks while also providing leverage for your escape. Place your hands on the mat, slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, and keep your elbows tucked in. Additionally, keep one leg up and one leg back, ready to explode into a defensive or offensive movement.

  3. Explosive Escapes: To escape from the turtle position, you need to be explosive. Use your legs to drive off the mat while simultaneously pushing with your hands to create distance between you and your opponent. This explosive movement can help you break free and regain a more advantageous position.

Remember, mastering the art of escaping from back control requires practice, timing, and technique. By implementing these strategies and drilling them regularly, you’ll be better equipped to escape bad positions and turn the tables in your favor during Jiu-Jitsu matches.

Escaping from Side Control

In Jiu-Jitsu, one of the most challenging positions to escape from is side control. When your opponent has secured side control, they have a dominant position that can make it difficult for you to regain control. However, there are several effective techniques you can use to escape from side control and turn the tables in your favor. In this article, we will explore three popular techniques: the Bump and Roll Escape, the Hip Escape, and the Underhook Escape.

Bump and Roll Escape

The Bump and Roll Escape is a fundamental technique that can be highly effective in escaping from side control. This technique relies on using your hips and explosiveness to create space and reverse the position. Here’s how you can execute the Bump and Roll Escape:

  1. Bridge and Shrimp: Start by bridging your hips off the ground and shrimping away from your opponent. This movement helps create the necessary space for the escape.
  2. Frame and Trap: As you shrimp, use your forearm to frame against your opponent’s neck or shoulder, creating a barrier between you and your opponent. Simultaneously, trap their arm on the same side as your frame.
  3. Bump and Roll: With your frame and trapped arm in place, explosively bump your hips towards your opponent, while simultaneously rolling onto your side. This sudden movement can catch your opponent off guard and create enough space for you to escape and establish a better position.

Hip Escape

The Hip Escape, also known as the "shrimp," is a fundamental movement in Jiu-Jitsu that can be utilized as an effective escape from side control. This technique focuses on using your hips to create space and regain control. Follow these steps to perform the Hip Escape:

  1. Bridge and Shrimp: Similar to the Bump and Roll Escape, begin by bridging your hips off the ground and shrimping away from your opponent. This motion helps create the necessary space for the escape.
  2. Frame and Regain Guard: As you shrimp, use your forearm to frame against your opponent’s neck or shoulder, creating a barrier between you and your opponent. Simultaneously, bring your knee up and place it between you and your opponent, effectively regaining your guard.

Underhook Escape

The Underhook Escape is a technique that capitalizes on gaining an underhook to create leverage and escape from side control. This technique allows you to control your opponent’s posture and transition to a more advantageous position. Here’s how you can execute the Underhook Escape:

  1. Frame and Underhook: Start by framing your forearm against your opponent’s neck or shoulder, creating a barrier. Simultaneously, use your other arm to swim under your opponent’s arm and secure an underhook.
  2. Hip Escape and Rotate: With the underhook secured, perform a hip escape by bridging your hips off the ground and shrimping away from your opponent. As you do this, rotate towards the side where you have the underhook, further disrupting your opponent’s control.
  3. Transition to a Better Position: Once you have created enough space, use the underhook to transition to a more advantageous position, such as regaining your guard or taking your opponent’s back.

By mastering these three techniques – the Bump and Roll Escape, the Hip Escape, and the Underhook Escape – you will significantly improve your ability to escape from side control in Jiu-Jitsu. Practice these techniques regularly and experiment with variations to find what works best for you. Remember, escaping from side control is a crucial skill that can turn the tide of a match and set you up for success in Jiu-Jitsu.

In conclusion, the art of escaping in Jiu-Jitsu is an essential skill for any practitioner. This article has explored various techniques that can be utilized to get out of bad positions. By understanding and implementing these techniques, individuals can effectively maneuver themselves out of disadvantageous situations and gain the upper hand in a fight. Whether it is escaping from mount, side control, or back control, practicing these techniques regularly will enhance one’s ability to escape and improve overall Jiu-Jitsu skills. With dedication and perseverance, mastering the art of escaping in Jiu-Jitsu is attainable, providing practitioners with the confidence and skill set needed to overcome adversity on the mat.